The Air Gear digital bomb has dropped

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If you've been waiting for Oh!great's inline-skating epic Air Gear to make its way to digital, have we got the news for you: the Air Gear digital bomb has dropped—

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—with all 6 omnibus editions (covering volumes 1 through 17 of the original single-volume releases) and

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volumes 18 through 33 of the single-editions!

That's 33-volumes worth of Air Gear all out now on Kindle, nook, Kobo, iBooks, and comiXology!

And look for Volume 34 (in both print and digital) to come out this April!

 

Creator Spotlight: Hiroya Oku (Inuyashiki)

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You may know Hiroya Oku from the GANTZ fame. But have you read his most recent manga, Inuyashiki?

To make a point how awesome this manga is, we're letting Oku-sensei speak his mind in this two-part exclusive interview:

Hiroya Oku on Inuyashiki (Creator Interview Part 1 of 2)
Hiroya Oku on Hollywood movies (Creator Interview Part 2 of 2)

About Hiroya Oku
Born in Fukuoka, Japan. Debuted as a mangaka (manga artist) in 1992, with his first series, Hen: Suzuki-kun and Sato-kun in Weekly Young Jump. The series became a hit and was adapted into a live-action TV series in 1996. In 2000 he started his most famous work, GANTZ, a sensational manga using CG for the background, driven by thrilling plots. It was adapted into anime, game, and live-action film and became a widely popular media franchise. In 2014 Oku started his latest series, Inuyashiki, in Evening.

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Although he's usually camera shy, Oku-sensei let us take this video of him drawing the two main characters from Inuyashiki for Kodansha Comics' YouTube series, These Hands Make Manga. Watch the video here.

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We're also giving away the sketch that you saw in the video, autographed and personalized by Oku-sensei. 

All you have to do is take a quick survey
But hurry—this sweepstakes ends on March 23, 2016. 
Click here to find out the contest rules.

Inuyashiki volumes 1-3 are available from Kodansha Comics

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You can also read the latest chapter of Inuyashiki streaming on Crunchyroll.

Find out more about Inuyashiki on KodanshaComics.com

February 23 New Releases: Fairy Tail, Noragami, LDK, Say I Love You + more

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New manga this week! Let's take a look at what's new to both brick+mortar and digital bookshelves …

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New volumes from two of Kodansha Comics' all-time hits, Fairy Tail by Hiro Mashima (check out his recently posted interview and sketch video here) and Tsubasa by CLAMP. Also Volume 11 from relative newbie, but no less a sensation, Noragami: Stray God by Adachitoka.

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As many a mangaphile already knows, Kodansha Comics publishes some of the best shojo comics around. Say I Love You. by Kanae Hazuki has been a recent breakout hit, but LDK by Ayu Watanabe, now just on its third volume, has gotten off to a great start. And Fairy Tail fans should definitely check out the fun new shojo spinoff, Fairy Tail Blue Mistral by Hiro Mashima and Rui Watanabe.

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Devil Survivorthe manga by Satoru Matsuba based on Atlus' video game, has been making waves, and now we have another Atlus game tie-in debuting this week, with Volume 1 of Persona Q: Shadow of the Labyrinth Side: P3 by mangaka So Tobita. Check out the free preview of all of Chapter 1 here.

Meanwhile, on a somewhat different wavelength, what's more fun than a new volume of Inuyashiki by Hiroya Oku—maybe the most shocking new manga launched since (Oku's own) Gantz? Check out our mind-bending interview with the very-intense and iconoclastic mangakacoming soon!

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Finally, major new strides in digital: new volumes of astronaut-drama Space Brothers and post-apocalyptic actioner COPPELION arrive on digital shelves this week.

But our big announcement this week is finally bringing all available volumes of Air Gear out digitally in one fell swoop—that's single Volumes 18 through 33 and 6 omnibus volumes comprising the beginning of the series—including the new and final omnibus volume, Volume 6! More info on the Air Gear digital bomb here.

Happy reading! 

Win This Autograph by Hiroya Oku (Creator of Inuyashiki, GANTZ)

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Have you seen the video of Hiroya Oku drawing the characters from Inuyashiki on Kodansha Comics’ YouTube series, “These Hands Make Manga”?

Well, guess what? We’re giving away this very sketch––with Oku-sensei’s autograph! He’ll even personalize it, signing it with your name!

All you have to do is take this quick survey*.

*Sweepstakes ends on March 11, 2016. 

For more features on Hiroya Oku, the creator of Inuyashiki and GANTZ, click here.

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Watch Hiroya Oku drawing Inuyashiki characters!

As a part of the Hiroya Oku Creator Spotlight, here's a rare video of Oku-sensei drawing Inuyashiki and Shishigami from Inuyashiki (from Kodansha Comics' YouTube series, These Hands Make Manga).

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Click here to watch this video. 

WIN THIS AUTOGRAPH!
But that's not all. You can actually win the autographed sketch Oku-sensei draws in this video. Click here for more details. 

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For more features on Hiroya Oku, the creator of Inuyashiki click here

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Hiroya Oku on Hollywood movies (Creator Interview Part 2 of 2)

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Interview by Misaki C. Kido

Do you ever wonder where a great artist get his or her influences from? Hiroya Oku admits to his passion and admiration for Hollywood movies and other popular media, which partly explains his cinematic storytelling in manga like Inuyashiki and GANTZ. But how deep down the rabbit hole does he go for truly original expression that hasn’t ever been done by Hollywood? It’s way deeper than anyone could ever imagine.

This is Part 2 of the interview with Hiroya Oku (on Hollywood movies). Click here for Part 1 (about Inuyashiki).

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About Hiroya Oku
Born in Fukuoka, Japan. Debuted as a mangaka (manga artist) in 1992, with his first series, Hen: Suzuki-kun and Sato-kun in Weekly Young Jump. The series became a hit and was adapted into a live-action TV series in 1996. In 2000 he started his most famous work, GANTZ, a sensational manga using CG for the background, driven by thrilling plots. It was adapted into anime, game, and live-action film and became a widely popular media franchise. In 2014 Oku started his latest series, Inuyashiki, in Evening.

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Inuyashiki is about a conflict between two ordinary people whose bodies are one day replaced by super robots. One decides to use the new body for good, another for evil.

“My goal is to make something that hasn’t been done by anybody yet.” —Hiroya Oku

Kodansha Comics (KC): Do you have any hobbies?
Hiroya Oku (HO): I love collecting figurines and watching movies. I constantly watch movies. Sometimes I go watch a movie in a theater, and on the way home, I rent another movie. I think I watch at least one movie a day. [laughs]

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A figurine of Reika from GANTZ on Oku’s desk.

KC: What kind of movies do you like to watch?
HO: Generally I like action or science fiction, but I also watch romance or drama, or any movies from America, France, Iran, or anywhere if it seems interesting.

KC: Did you watch any good movies recently?
HO: I liked Kingsman: The Secret Service.

KC: Do you think watching movies helps your storytelling in any way?
HO: I want to stay on top of anything new from Hollywood and video games. I use the internet to keep up on the most cutting-edge expression out there. On top of that I want to take my own expression slightly further than what’s already there. My goal is to make something that hasn’t been done by anybody yet. If anyone says something like, “Oh, that’s just like Halo,” it means that it’s not really interesting, because it’s not truly original. If anyone says, “I’ve never seen anything like this before,” that’s what you’re looking for. Whether it’s manga, movies, or anime, people won’t be interested in your work if you don’t do something that anyone hasn’t seen before.

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Hiroya Oku’s audio room. He has a projector screen, too.

KC: Is it hard to making a new expression when you have nothing to compare?
HO: I guess it is, and it isn’t. I’m observing what’s been done and what’s not been done in films and video games. Based on that, I simply ask myself, “Has this ever been done before?” The gauge is there, so I don’t have too much trouble making new expressions.

KC: If Inuyashiki was a movie, which genre would it be categorized under?
HO: I think it’d just be under science fiction or superheroes. I’ve always loved the superhero genre since I was little, like Kamen Rider and Ultraman. I don’t really watch those shows nowadays, but I still watch all the movie adaptations of American superhero comics, like Spiderman.

KC: What’s your opinion of movie adaptations of comic books?
HO: I think they often do a really good job turning a comic into a movie. Honestly, I’m not that interested in the American comics themselves. But when they become a movie, suddenly it becomes easier to get into. You can tell that very talented people work hard to brush up the original work, like the designs, to make it look cool in a modern-day live-action movie.

KC: Do you get inspired from looking at other people’s work, like these movies?
HO: Absolutely. That’s basically everything to me. I kind of look at them [Hollywood creators] as my rivals. It motivates me to go above and beyond what they’re creating. I even dig into the artbooks and reference books that detail the process work of all these movies, and compare it to the final works in the actual film. It’s fascinating to see different parts of movie production assigned to genius-level talents. It’s definitely hard to outdo them with my own small team. Yet we still have to try, because it’s pointless to just “copy” Spiderman and Avengers. Trying is the only way to surpass what’s already been done. That’s what’s in back of my mind when I am making manga.

 

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This is just a fraction of Oku’s personal collection of movies.

KC: What is your sign?
HO: I'm a Virgo. 

KC: Do you want to go work in Hollywood one day?
HO: No. Actually I don’t really like traveling abroad because I am terrified of flying on a plane. [laughs] So I don’t want to go overseas too much.

KC: What if your manga becomes a Hollywood film, how would you feel then?
HO: If that ever happens, I’d probably be very happy. And I am hoping that would happen someday. But that’s more like a dream and also has to do with luck. So I’m not counting on it too much.

KC: Do you realize that there are fans of your work in other countries too?
HO: If my manga resonates with someone overseas, it just means that person shares my taste. That itself wouldn’t be so surprising. Because it’s just like how Hollywood movies are appreciated by different people around the world. I get influenced from the movies or videogames that I like and make something more than what already exists. If some people get it or like it, it’ll makes me happy, but it wouldn’t be so surprising.

KC: Do you have any comments for your fans?
HO: To know that there’s somebody from a completely different part of the world who likes to read my manga, that makes me really happy. I’m trying to make Inuyashiki as if it’s a single movie, and it will get more exciting as the series progresses. So I hope you look forward to it and follow Inuyashiki.

KC: Thank you!

Watch the video of Hiroya Oku drawing the two main characters from Inuyashiki on Kodansha Comics YouTube channel.

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You can also win this autograph! Click here to learn more.

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Inuyashiki volumes 1-3 by Hiroya Oku are available from Kodansha Comics.

You can also read the latest chapter streaming on Crunchyroll.

Hiroya Oku on Inuyashiki (Creator Interview Part 1 of 2)

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Interview by Misaki C. Kido

Hiroya Oku is an alchemist of storytelling. He closely studies theories behind storytelling in every popular media, imbibes them, and somehow transforms them into a truly original story that no one has ever seen before.

If you’ve been away from manga, thinking you’ve seen it all, think again after reading Inuyashiki, the newest mind-bender of manga by the creator of GANTZ.

This is Part 1 of the interview with Hiroya Oku (about Inuyashiki). Click here for Part 2 (on Hollywood movies).

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About Hiroya Oku
Born in Fukuoka, Japan. Debuted as a mangaka (manga artist) in 1992, with his first series, Hen: Suzuki-kun and Sato-kun in Weekly Young Jump. The series became a hit and was adapted into a live-action TV series in 1996. In 2000 he started his most famous work, GANTZ, a sensational manga using CG for the background, driven by thrilling plots. It was adapted into anime, game, and live-action film and became a widely popular media franchise. In 2014 Oku started his latest series, Inuyashiki, in Evening.

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“I try to make a story that I want to see next.” ––Hiroya Oku

Kodansha Comics (KC): What was it like when you were a kid?
Hiroya Oku (HO): When I was a kid, I liked playing outside. I used to play baseball with other kids, roller skated, made hideouts. I was just an ordinary kid.

KC: When did you pick up drawing?
HO: I got into drawing when I was in kindergarten. I remember being influenced by another kid who was drawing on the sand on the ground using a rock. I was drawing superhero characters from tokusatsu (special effects) TV shows. It was just simple drawings with basic shapes, so it was easier than drawing other things like humans.

KC: Did you read manga back then?
HO: Not really. I used to watch TV more, so I saw more anime, like Kyojin no Hoshi and Tezuka’s Jungle Taitei (Kimba the White Lion). I remember being really into it.

KC: Do you still watch anime?
HO: Not really. I rarely watch anime nowadays.

KC: What were you doing between your previous series, GANTZ, and your current series, Inuyashiki?
HO: Actually there was hardly any time between those series. I thought of the idea of Inuyashiki when I was wrapping up GANTZ. So Inuyashiki was already set in motion before I was done with GANTZ. When GANTZ ended, Inuyashiki started immediately, so I didn’t have any break in between.

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GANTZ is available from Dark Horse Comics.

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Inuyashiki is available from Kodansha Comics.

KC: How did you think of the idea of Inuyashiki?
HO: When I was still working on GANTZ, the editor from Kodansha came and asked me if I wanted to do my next manga series for their magazine. So I was thinking about what what kind of story I wanted to work on next. Around that time, I was randomly watching the new Astro Boy movie. The setup of the story is that once there was a human boy, the original, who died, and thus they made a copy of him as a robot, which is the Astro Boy. I thought this was interesting. If I could make my own version of the story, with a similar setup, it could be a new series. That was the beginning of Inuyashiki. It’s about an ordinary person who dies and gets replaced by a super robot. When I was working on GANTZ on Shueisha’s Young Jump Magazine, I was more concerned about the popularity and sales figures of my manga. In that magazine’s culture, there’s an unspoken rule to make the main characters visually attractive. When I started work for Kodansha’s Evening, there was more freedom. So I suggested going with the not-so-good-looking teenager as a main character. They green-lit the idea, so I started drawing the character in the manga. But something wasn’t working right. So for a try, I drew an old man as the main character instead. Then everything clicked.

KC: How would you describe the two main characters in Inuyashiki?
HO: They both start out as human, but as they become robots, they start to feel the void in life. It would be hard to admit if your body suddenly became a machine. I would imagine that they’d feel like they’re not truly alive. In order to fill the void, one starts to save lives with his new body, and another starts to take lives. One becomes good, and one becomes evil. Ultimately, they have to face off against each other.

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KC: So these main characters have a body of a robot, but also a heart of a human?
HO: They’ve definitely got hearts of humans, because they were originally copied from humans. But when they realize they are not really human, they become really sad, very empty, and have a hard time accepting this truth. So they want proof that they’re alive, thus they take their own course of action.

KC: It’s kind of a sad story.
HO: It is kind of a sad story. Astro Boy was like that too. Like in the world of Astro Boy, the robots don’t have the same rights as humans. This becomes a conflict when a robot has a personality of a human. This is one of the ongoing themes for all science fiction, so I wanted to spin it in my own way.

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If you suddenly became a robot one day, what would you do?

KC: Do you like making stories or drawing art?
HO: I like them both. I like the process of taking all aspects and turning it into a manga. I like writing stories, drawing art, and confirming what it turned out to be. When I make a manga, I start out with a blueprint in my mind. It consists of logic and theories, but I try to combine these loose ideas and components into a single piece. Only when I look at it later, I can clearly see what it turned into. Sometimes it turns out to be better or worse than what I expected. That’s really interesting to me. It’s like a science experiment. You have a theory, like, if you combined chemical A and B, it’ll make an explosion. Sometimes it goes accordingly to your theory, sometimes it becomes a bigger explosion than you expected. [laughs]

KC: Do you have an example of one of your manga experiments “getting out of hand” in Inuyashiki?
HO: In my manga, we use photos and CG as backgrounds. So in general, it’s hard to tell how the scene is going to look and feel like until it’s done. For example, for the scene in Inuyashiki where the characters fly in the sky, we used a drone. Actually, we hired someone to fly a drone to capture a birds-eye view and used that image as the manga background. We also hired a helicopter to get a higher view. But for the moment of take-off, I had a feeling that we wouldn’t be able to capture it without a drone. I had no idea what it was going to look like. It turned out to be a scene with more presence than I ever imagined. I don’t think anyone has ever used that method in manga—or maybe it’s even rare in live-action films—so I was quite happy. It really feels like flying.

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A flying scene from Inuyashiki volume 2.

KC: How much of your work is made with digital vs. traditional media?
HO: Everything except human or animal characters are done in digital. Most of the background, mechas are digital, but anything that is alive is all drawn by hand.

KC: When you make a manga, do you have a certain audience in mind?
HO: Not really. I try to make a story that I want to see next. I tend to imagine if there was another person like me, an audience who enjoys all things entertainment, like movies. I try to make manga that may be interesting to that person. Otherwise, it’s never-ending. Everyone thinks differently, and you can’t please everyone. So I tend to focus on what’s interesting to me. Someone who has similar taste as mine may enjoy my manga.

Interview with Hiroya Oku continues to Part 2: Hiroya Oku on Hollywood Films.

Inuyashiki vol.1-3 by Hiroya Oku is available from Kodansha Comics.

You can also read the latest chapter streaming on Crunchyroll.

Creator Spotlight: Hiro Mashima (Fairy Tail)

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Fairy Tail fans! Here's a few long-awaited features on one of the greatest manga artists from Kodansha Comics, Hiro Mashima!

Interview: Hiro Mashima on Fairy Tail

Have you ever wondered what the creator of your favorite manga is like in person? You won't be disappointed with the way Mashima-sensei is after reading this exclusive interview. Read more …

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Sketch Video: Hiro Mashima drawing Fairy Tail characters

Take a close look at Mashima-sensei drawing and coloring Natsu and Happy from Fairy Tail  (from Kodansha Comics' YouTube series, These Hands Make Manga). Watch the video here

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Hiro Mashima Autograph Sweepstakes*

We're not kidding. You can enter for a chance to win the autographed sketch Mashima-sensei draws in the video. 

All you have to do is take a quick survey.

Click here to find out the contest rules. 

*sweepstakes ends on March 15, 2016

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Fairy Tail volumes 1 through 51 by Hiro Mashima are available from Kodansha Comics!

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New to the world of Fairy Tail? Catch up to the story with the 5-volumes-in-1 Master’s Edition!

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Don’t forget to check out the spin-off series of Fairy Tail!

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Fairy Girls

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Fairy Tail Ice Trail

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Fairy Tail Blue Mistral

Also the latest chapter of Fairy Tail is available on Crunchyroll Manga!

Find out more about Fairy Tail manga series on KodanshaComics.com

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Watch Hiro Mashima drawing Fairy Tail characters! (and win this autograph!)

As a part of the Hiro Mashima Creator Spotlight, here's a rare video of Mashima-sensei drawing and coloring Natsu and Happy from Fairy Tail (from Kodansha Comics' YouTube series, These Hands Make Manga).

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There is a short version and a long version of this video.

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WIN THIS AUTOGRAPH!

But that's not all. You can actually win the autographed sketch Mashima-sensei draws in this video. 

All you have to do is take this quick survey*. 

*sweepstakes ends on March 15, 2016

For more features on Hiro Mashima, the creator of Fairy Tail, click here.

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Find out more about Fairy Tail manga series on KodanshaComics.com

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Creator Interview: Hiro Mashima on Fairy Tail

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Interview by Misaki C. Kido

For Hiro Mashima, making manga is his true calling. Just from reading his bestselling epic about the world of wizards, Fairy Tail, you can sense how devoted he is to his work. Meeting him in person, you encounter more to his personality that explains how he can make such a manga. He’s a forever-humble student of life as well as a big-hearted teacher, fascinated by the making of manga more than anybody. This perfect balance is the ultimate drive that keeps him working on a long-running—and sometimes even multiple—manga series.

This interview is for old and new fans of Fairy Tail, who wants to know a little more about the personal side of Mashima-sensei!

About Hiro Mashima
Born in 1977 and debuted as a manga-ka (manga artist) in 1998. His first long-running series, Rave Master, ran in Weekly Shonen Magazine from 1999 to 2005. He serialized his current series, Fairy Tail, in the same magazine since 2006. When Fairy Tail was adapted as an anime series in 2009, it became a global hit. Other renowned works includes Monster Hunter Orage, Monster Soul, and Mashima-en.

List of Awards
2009 Fairy Tail: Kodansha Manga Award/Shonen Genre (Japan)
2009 Fairy Tail: Japan Expo Best Manga Award/Shonen Genre (France)
2011 Fairy Tail: ANIMELAND Best Anime Award (France)
2011 Fairy Tail: ANIMELAND Best Dubbed Anime Award (France)
2011 Fairy Tail: Frankfurt Book Fair/International Comics Award (Germany)
2012 Fairy Tail: Salon del Manga Best Series Award (Spain)
2012 Fairy Tail: Salon del Manga Best Creator Award (Spain)
2012 Fairy Tail: Salon del Manga Best Guest of Honor Award (Spain)

“I love and am fascinated by the whole process of making manga.” —Hiro Mashima

Kodansha Comics (KC): What was it like when you were a kid?
Hiro Mashima (HM): When I was little, I was an indoor kid. I always loved doing something at home. Of course I liked to play outside with friends too, but I enjoyed drawing or playing video games, doing something that takes imagination at home.

KC: When did you pick up drawing?
HM: I’ve been drawing as long as I can remember. I have an early memory of my grandfather showing me a manga magazine that he picked up somewhere. I thought the drawings in it was so cool, so I tried to copy it. That’s probably when I realized that I love to draw. And I still love to draw!

KC: Story or art; which one comes more naturally to you?
HM: That’s a tough one. They are both really fun. When I make a story, I’m rolling out my imagination to figure out what’s going to happen, and that’s really fun. When I draw, I go through a lot of trial and error to get something to look cool or cute. That’s also fun. I love and am fascinated by the whole process of making manga.

KC: Do you think about anything particular when you draw?
HM: I’m actually not very good at drawing female characters. I want to draw them so cute I feel a lot of pressure drawing them. In contrast, guy characters are easy. I can just draw them quickly.

KC: How did you come up with the world of Fairy Tail?
HM: It actually goes back to the series I worked on before, Rave Master. In one episode, there was a scene where a group of guys are hanging out at a bar. That was fun to draw. So I wanted to draw a manga with the feel of guys hanging out at a bar. I thought it’d be interesting to enter a world where characters have established relationships, like friendship. Usually a shonen manga starts with just a main character, who then slowly accumulates his or her allies as the story progresses. But in the world of Fairy Tail, everybody pretty much knows each other at the beginning. That was sort of what I was going for.

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KC: Is it difficult to work with a story that’s set in a fantasy world with things like magic?
HM: It’s not hard, because in a world with magic, you can pretty much do anything! It’s actually harder for me to work on a story that’s set in real life, because there are a lot of restrictions. For example, in a real-life setting, in order to walk into a room, you have to open the door. But in a fantasy setting, you can enter the room however you want. Literally anything goes.

KC: How would you describe the main characters of Fairy Tail?
HM: They are real trouble. [laughs] At first I was trying to make the characters people I want to be friends with. But from anyone else’s eyes, they’re serious troublemakers. They won’t listen to anyone. Still, I want them to be people to look up to to for kids who read the manga.

KC: Do you feel like there’s some resemblance of yourself to the characters?
HM: I do. I think every character that I come up with is somehow a reflection of myself. Sometimes I’m fiery like Natsu, sometimes I’m serious like Lucy, take off my clothes like Gray … or not. [laughs]

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KC: How do you keep your motivation for work?
HM: I try to have fun every now and then. I take a lot of breaks and do something else for a change. Also, I’m sure every creator feels this way, but the readers’ voices that I receive from fan letters are very encouraging to me. It makes me want to keep making manga that people can enjoy.

KC: Do you have a certain audience in mind when you make manga?
HM: I try to make manga that’s fun for teenagers, but I also want it to be interesting enough for adults too.

KC: I’ve heard that Miki Yoshikawa (creator of Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches) was your assistant back in the day. What was it like to work with her?

HM: Miki Yoshikawa always had a great imagination. For example, whenever I ask an assistant to draw a background in a panel, I’ll usually give some specific direction of what I’m thinking. But every time she drew something for me, it’d always surpass my expectation. She’d add tiny little details in the scene—even something simple like a duck in the background—that I didn’t ask for. She did this constantly. She was still pretty young back then, so she knew her art still needed some work. But I don’t really remember teaching her anything, because she already had what it takes. I think we spent most of the time doing fun stuff, like playing video games together. Although, I always hoped that she’d start her own manga series someday.

KC: How many assistants do you work with now?
HM: Recently we’ve lost one person, so there are three assistants now. It’s tough not having a full team.

KC: Do you like to use digital or analog tools for drawing?
HM: Most of my manga is drawn by hand. But sometimes I do try to play around with illustration programs like Photoshop and ComicStudio. Even then, I try to make it look like it was drawn and colored by hand. I try to avoid using any effects that are only possible by digital tools. My favorite tool is still Copic pens though. But it’s a very hard medium to work with, and there are people who are better at it than me. I know the limits of my own ability, so I try to make the best of it.

KC: Have you been playing any video games recently?
HM: Yes I have. I’ve been playing Call of Duty: Black Ops 3. I don’t know why they have to release it when I’m so busy! [laughs]

KC: What’s your zodiac sign?
HM: I’m a Taurus! Actually, there’s a character names Taurus in Fairy Tail. So I wanted to make sure he’s super-powerful.

KC: If a new person wants to get into reading Fairy Tail now, how would you recommend they dive into the series?
HM: I think the best way to get into Fairy Tail is to find your own favorite character. I try to make every character to be unique, so they may appeal to different kinds of people.

KC: Do you have any comments for fans?
HM: I feel so happy people outside of Japan read and know about Fairy Tail. When I’m on Twitter, I get comments from fans all around the world. That’s really encouraging. I don’t understand other languages too well, but sometimes I try to read and write in English. Or sometimes I try to post some art, because language doesn’t matter. It’s one of the ways to give back to the fans. I hope you guys will continue to enjoy and support Fairy Tail!

KC: Thank you!

Want to watch Mashima-sensei in action? You can watch the sketch video here.

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You can also win the autographed sketch Hiro Mashima draws in the video.

All you have to do is take this survey.  

Fairy Tail volumes 1 through 51 by Hiro Mashima are available from Kodansha Comics.

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New to the world of Fairy Tail? Catch up to the story with the 5-volumes-in-1 Master’s Edition!

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Also, don’t forget to check out the spin-off series of Fairy Tail!

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Fairy Girls

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Fairy Tail Ice Trail

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Fairy Tail Blue Mistral

Also the latest chapter of Fairy Tail is available on Crunchyroll Manga!

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