New year, new yuri & BL! Featuring Yuri is My Job! Plus interview with Comic Yuri Hime’s Editor-in-Chief!

It’s a brand-new year, with all-new manga! But this year Kodansha Comics doesn’t just have brand-new manga for you—we’re excited to be making our BL and yuri debut with not one, not two, but three series today—available in both print & digital editions! Read on to learn all about our debut yuri and BL series—and read a first chapter preview by clicking on the covers—and to learn a little bit about the history of yuri manga through an exclusive interview with Comic Yuri Hime magazine and Yuri Is My Job Editor-in-Chief Kanako Umezawa and a yuri essay excerpt from Erica Friedman!

New Yuri & BL Manga debuting January 22!

 

10 DANCE Volume 1

By Inouesatoh

The beautifully-detailed, lithe bodies of the two “kings of the ballroom” fly across the dance floor as rivals build a volatile bond in this red-hot romance!

Shinya Sugiki, the dashing lord of Standard Ballroom, and Shinya Suzuki, passionate king of Latin Dance: The two share more than just a first name and a love of the sport. They each want to become champion of the 10-Dance Competition, which means they’ll need to learn the other’s specialty dances, and who better to learn from than the best? But old rivalries die hard, and things get complicated even further when they realize there might be more between them than an uneasy partnership…

10 DANCE Volume 1 is out in print & digital TODAY!

 

 

Hitorijime My Hero Volume 1

By Memeco Arii

A BL romance between a good boy who didn’t know he was waiting for a hero, and a bad boy who comes to his rescue!

Masahiro Setagawa doesn’t believe in heroes, but wishes he could: He’s found himself in a gang of small-time street bullies who use him to run errands. But when high school teacher (and scourge of the streets) Kousuke Ohshiba comes to his rescue, he finds he may need to start believing after all…and as their relationship deepens, he realizes a hero might be just what he was looking for this whole time.

Hitorijime My Hero Volume 1 is out in print & digital TODAY!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yuri Is My Job! Volume 1

By Miman

Kodansha Comics is proud to announce our first ever yuri release—the acclaimed, hilarious yuri comedy Yuri Is My Job!

Hime is a picture-perfect high school princess, so when she accidentally injures a café manager named Mai, she’s willing to cover some shifts to keep her facade intact. To Hime’s surprise, the café is themed after a private school where the all-female staff always puts on their best act for their loyal customers. However, under the guidance of the most graceful girl there, Hime can’t help but blush and blunder! Beneath all the frills and laughter, Hime feels tension brewing as she finds out more about her new job and her budding feelings …

Yuri Is My Job!  Volume 1 is out in print & digital TODAY!

 

 

 

 

Interview: Kanako Umezawa, Editor-in-chief of Comic Yuri Hime

And now, here’s an exclusive interview with Yuri Is My Job! and Comic Yuri Hime Editor-in-Chief, Kanako Umezawa!

 

About Kanako Umezawa:

Umezawa is a graduate of Waseda University. Through her editorial work on Yuri Shimai (Magazine Magazine), she joined the editorial staff for Comic Yuri Hime (Ichijinsha). Having worked on Comic Yuri Hime since the very first issue, she has served as Editor-in-Chief since 2017. She has managed titles such as citrus and NTR: Netsuzou Trap.

 

 

 

 

 

Q. In the early 2000s, the term “yuri” became more and more commonplace. This was also around the same time that Comic Yuri Hime’s predecessor, Yuri Shimai magazine, was running. What do you think made yuri become so big? How have changing internet trends and platforms affected yuri media and its popularity today?

Kanako Umezawa (KU): Yuri has always been an indispensable part of shojo novels and manga, even if it was hiding on the fringes, but I think what really kicked off the popular recognition of the term “yuri” was when the anime series Maria Watches Over Us started airing in 2004. After that, slice-of-life genre anime like those from Houbunsha, or the adaptation of YuruYuri, pushed yuri even further into the public consciousness. I think that provided a framework where people could see yuri as something fun and lighthearted, instead of the somewhat unapproachable image it had before.

And with the internet, yuri fans could take a more grassroots approach and could find each other’s posts on social media, making it possible for people to share and distribute yuri fan work in a more seamless fashion. Those things certainly played a role in spreading the genre and establishing a foothold in the industry, and I believe they’re linked to the current popularity of the yuri genre.

Yuri manga lends itself to digital distribution, and my impression is that there has been a steady increase in both print books and digital sales. Also, this is something that’s especially striking for citrus, but the large number of international fans is one of yuri’s strengths, in my opinion. Following in citrus’s international popularity may be Yuri Is My Job!  and going forward, I’ll be doing my part with the editorial staff to target the series to international audiences and try to build up its appeal.

For the future, I plan to focus on what the editorial staff needs to do in order for us to keep up with not only digital and international markets, but also what’s culturally relevant. In particular, we’ll be focusing on what can help our stories remain great for our increasingly borderless modern readers.

Q. What were the biggest differences you found in overseeing editorial for manga that was not yuri, compared to what you do now? What are the editorial hurdles you face specifically with a yuri magazine?

KU: With editing yuri manga, when you’re working with the authors to create a project, your biggest priority is whether the first chapter truly showcases the characteristic charm and satisfaction of yuri to readers who love the genre. In order to achieve that goal, right from the planning stage, the editor must get a firm grasp of the following: what the author wants to convey in the project, what kind of characters they want to create, and which pairings they want. Then, the key is whether or not the editor can offer support and advice to make those things appeal to readers who love yuri. Also, it’s extremely important to consider how much of a change in the main couple’s relationship you want to reveal by the end of the first volume. Though, editorially, I’d say the significance of the first chapter and the first volume are the same for any other manga as well.

As for editorial hurdles with yuri … The artists are the ones dealing with actually bringing a project to life and experiencing difficult emotions. So as an editor, I don’t feel their same difficulties in editing the work itself. I would just say it’s essential for a yuri editor to always be conscious of what readers are currently looking for in their yuri. Our editorial staff is constantly talking about that, and it’s an indispensable but challenging skill to acquire. For example…

The almost chemical reaction that’s sparked when a girl meets another girl … The feeling a girl gets when she embraces another girl … Being able to gently and utterly capture those moments and be in tune with those emotions is very important for editors of yuri manga. Even while looking at work that’s written off as “just yuri,” it’s important for a yuri manga editor to know that each relationship and emotion expressed is only one of a thousand different ways to portray yuri. A yuri editor should constantly strive to be a mediator, to make sure the yuri author’s joy lines up with the joy of the reader.

Q. What difference in story creation and reader engagement was there when Comic Yuri Hime changed from a quarterly to bimonthly, and then finally to a monthly publication schedule?

KU: At the start, when we were a quarterly publication, we primarily published standalone stories with comics on smaller, A5-sized pages, and had subject matter aimed at our core, yuri-loving readers. As yuri gradually came to be more recognized, and we transitioned to bimonthly and then monthly publications, we shifted our focus to serialized stories. We also saw a sudden increase in the rate of publication for our comics, and starting with YuruYuri, stories being adapted into other media also got more attention. Sometimes we get readers who swoop in at the most important moments to tell us that those anime adaptations are the first time they’ve seen the yuri genre, and then they decided to pick up Yuri Hime! This is a great cycle that happens regularly, and I feel that this promotes positive feedback and helps increase magazine readers.

Q. Comic Yuri Hime is known for its quality work and curation—in a yuri story, what’s that special spark that makes the story stand a cut above the rest?

KU: I think for a yuri story, the most important thing is intimately conveying the charm of a pairing to the reader. From my experience, I’ve found that the pairing and the story feed off of each other—and that’s when the allure of a yuri story becomes palpable for the reader.

Q. What trends do you see lately in Comic Yuri Hime and what trends do you think you’ll see in the future?

KU: In short, it’s a return to what’s essential and classic. Lately, even with other publishers, we’re seeing a lot of projects with yuri as the central theme that are becoming hits or successfully getting adapted into other media. So I think the yuri genre will continue to spread and establish itself even more than it currently is.

As for current trends, I feel quite strongly that our magazine—as a source that specializes in yuri—is making a home for projects that can thoroughly serve the yuri market.

As for future trends—though this could be said for manga and otaku genres in general—I would imagine that the distinction between the reader’s sex would gradually disappear. For example, the delineation made between media targeted at men and media targeted at women, even in yuri manga, would most likely fade.

Q. What media (manga, literature, movies, etc.) influenced you? What led you to do editorial work in Comic Yuri Hime?

KU: Ever since I was little, I’ve loved books and manga of all kinds, but when I read Nangoku Shounen Papuwa-kun, I sensed there was something more than friendship between the male characters, and that opened my eyes to the yaoi way of reading things. From there, I devoured BL manga and novels, but I wasn’t fully aware of yuri stories until I saw an anime called Battle Athletes, and also Revolutionary Girl Utena. Utena in particular shook up my adolescent sensibilities and had a huge influence on my future values.

I recall other things that I liked were movies you’d find in an indie theater, direct-to-video, stuff like that—what you might call underground works. And I feel like I’ve always enjoyed mysteries, sci-fi, and other stuff that’s a little bit off the beaten path for the entertainment industry.

Later, during college, I got a part-time job with the manga editorial staff for a publishing company. I had the opportunity to interact with editors and manga creators while there, and I made it my mission to get hired at a publishing company. But when I couldn’t, I ended up working at an editorial company instead. That’s where I picked up a magazine with job listings and saw an ad looking for a manga editor. So I applied to work at Yuri Shimai, which was the precursor to Comic Yuri Hime. My focus was on the page content and the binding, which the editor-in-chief in my early days, Nakamura, was very particular about. At the beginning, I didn’t have any strong interest in yuri, and was just single-mindedly focused on becoming a manga editor any way I could.

When I started actually getting involved with the yuri manga editorial staff, I picked up on the enthusiasm the manga creators had for their yuri work. I also began to develop a desire to reciprocate the passion that the readers had for the genre, and from that point on, yuri manga had me under its spell.

Now that I’ve overseen many different yuri projects, I feel like the true pleasure of editing yuri manga lies in how yuri is a special genre that can cross the boundary between reality and fantasy. What’s more, I can really rely on and lean into my feelings and lived experiences as a woman.

Thank you!

While reading Yuri Is My Job! by Miman, readers may wonder about the setting and characters of the story. Erica Friedman’s essay, “Why Is It Always Catholic Schoolgirls in Yuri?” touches on this topic. You can read an excerpt below, and the full essay here.

As manga fans—as Yuri fans—in the west, we surely have asked ourselves “Why is Yuri so often set in a Catholic school? And why “sisters?” surprisingly, there is an answer to this question. Around the time Japan entered the international stage, schooling for adolescents of both sexes was a prominent social cause in the late 19th century. In Japan, just as in America and Europe, it was often religious organizations that oversaw this education. Single-sex schools became popular for children of the growing middle class.

[And] in order to curb adolescent passion in these schools, traditions were founded that focused admiration-tinged-with-desire on strictly maintained hierarchies … Girls’ literature of the early 20th century in Japan focused on these relationships, presenting them as passionate, yet platonic bonds of sisterhood. Intense emotional relationships between older students and younger were transformed into sisterly feelings. Japanese girls’ magazines were filled with letters and stories of these heart-pounding feelings for older or younger “sisters.”

In the late 20th century, this foundation of girl’s literature became fixed as Yuri was born amidst the upheavals of the 1970s. Popular literature had detailed these affairs of the heart, mostly set in Catholic schools—so, when girls’ manga later wanted to tell this same story, immediately these tales were given the “exotic” setting of private religious schools.

… So it makes perfect sense that Miman-sensei combined the two for a trope-filled yuri romp in Yuri Is My Job! Welcome to a salon where maidens with pure hearts serve you delicious sweets, admire their “schwestern” and vie to be the Blüme, the most popular girl at the school.

Note: This is an excerpt of an article that originally appeared on Okazu, on December 16, 2018.

Translation Notes

Yuri
Yuri, or literally “lily,” is a genre covering female same-sex relationships within manga, anime, and other media. In addition to same-sex romance, it can also cover female friendships. Yuri and Girls Love are sometimes used in the same vein.

Yuri Shimai
Yuri Shimai (“Yuri/Lily Sisters”) is the name of a quarterly manga anthology magazine that ran between June 2003 and November 2004. Magazine Magazine was its Japanese publisher.

Comic Yuri Hime
Comic Yuri Hime (“Comic Yuri/Lily Princess”) is the name of a manga anthology magazine that began in July 2005 and continues to be published monthly. Ichijinsha is its Japanese publisher.

Houbunsha
Houbunsha is a Japanese publishing company. Some slice-of-life anime series of their works featuring prominent female friendships include: K-ON! and Hidamari Sketch.

A5 size
A5 is a common book size (5.8in x 8.3in) for collected volumes, or for magazines geared towards more niche or older audiences. It is comparable to the size of a personal planner/agenda and is collectible. For reference, many mainstream shonen manga magazines are much larger, at B5 size (6.9in x 9.8in) and are usually recycled after reading.

Otaku
Most commonly localized in English as “nerd/geek,” an otaku is an obsessive fan who hoards information and merchandise of their favorite things—there are train otaku, camera otaku, and most famously, anime and manga otaku. The word “otaku” in Japanese is a formal and honorific pronoun that the speaker uses to address “you,” reflecting their insider culture.

Yaoi and BL
Yaoi and BL (Boys Love) is a genre covering male same-sex relationships within manga, anime, and other media.

 

More BL the better? Check out these digital-first BL series from Kodansha Comics!

 

Announcing: August 2018 digital-first debuts!

The campaign continues as we launch at least one new “digital-first”manga series every week, and in August we kick off 8 new manga series, with some new and classic shojo manga, a manga-to-anime yakuza-to-idol comedy, and 5 (yes) digital-first yaoi manga!

Kodansha Comics’s digital-first manga releases are part of an exciting new initiative begun last year to put a greater diversity of manga series into the market. This month’s series debuts will be available at all of Kodansha Comics’s partner digital platforms, including Amazon Kindle, BookWalker, comiXology, Google Play, Kobo, and nook:

Debuts August 7th! My Boy in Blue By Maki Miyoshi 
Kako gets tangled up when she lies about her age in order to attend a company-mixer party for singles and ends up totally infatuated with her young local policeman! And it looks like it’s mutual with Kota… until he finds out Kako’s still in high school. Read on to see if straight-arrow Kota manages to find a way to do the right thing as our story unfolds in the first volume of this upbeat new romantic comedy from Maki Miyoshi!

Debuts August 14th! Back Street Girls By Jasmine Gyuh 
Tough gangland retribution takes a disturbingly bright, shiny turn in this insanely guilty pleasure about 3 yakuzas who, as repayment for their failures, must undergo major surgery and become … a hot female idol trio! So what happens when they become the next big pop sensation!?     

Debuts August 28th! Peach Girl by Miwa Ueda  
Yes! The complete 18-volume run of Miwa Ueda’s ‘90s shojo megahit Peach Girl is back! Suntans and bleached hair were never quite so problematic, and high school drama was never quite so …. dramatic! This digital reissued edition combines the original Tokyopop run of Peach Girl and Peach Girl: Change of Heart.

… and last but not least! In addition to the print yaoi and yuri manga announcements we made at Anime Expo, we announced five new yaoi titles from Kodansha’s Honey Milk imprint for release on August 21! Behold:

Stray Bullet Baby by Kei Ichikawa 
Chihiro Murakami works at a film advertising firm and looks up to Kiyoharu Honna, the stylish editor of the trendy magazine his company does business with. He’s cool, his smile is beautiful, and he’s good at his job. But Chihiro hasn’t had a chance yet to get close to him. However, one day he ends up looking after a dead-drunk Honna and goes home with him and … !? A selfish beauty and the man wrapped around his finger.

Keeping His Whims in Check by Pi
Proclaimed handsome elite businessman, Yuto Shinonome, falls in love at first sight with Tamaki, a beauty who’s exactly his type. It hits him like a ton of bricks when he finds out Tamaki is actually a guy!! Nevertheless, Yuto still acts like a kid with a crush and teases Tamaki like there’s no tomorrow … How can perverse Yuto handle love!?

Intertwining Lives by KAZU
Yoshiya thinks it’s fate when he’s reunited with his first love; however, he learns they can never be together … For middle-aged scriptwriter Makoto and beautiful actor-in-the-making Yuu, it’s a chance meeting in which admiration turns to love, and love turns to doubt …?! A young and heartrending adolescent love story and a bittersweet mature romance. The stories of a group of men who mingle, intertwine, and change.

Key Ring Lock by ymz
Permanent part-timer, Yui, discovers a worn-out man fallen on the street. Unable to leave the strangely charming Toshiki alone, Yui helps him back home and then accepts Toshiki while being manipulated by him. However, when Yui gets up in the morning, he finds himself locked in and unable to leave. “Confinement is my hobby,” says a smiling Toshiki. Is this confinement, or is it … Their sensitive love flickers in the space between the normal and abnormal!

Trap in a Skirt by Puruchome
Androgynous Aoi has a traumatic past that makes it difficult for him to get the true satisfaction he desires. Meanwhile, Aoi’s classmate, Takano, the rough class outsider, makes a move on Aoi whenever he has the chance. Aoi doesn’t take him seriously in the beginning, however …


More information about Kodansha Comics’s “digital-first” initiative can be found here.

Announcements from San Diego Comic Con (July 19-22)!

Psssst! Going to San Diego Comic Con July 19-22? 

We’re going to have some exciting new announcements for Battle Angel Alita and The Ghost in the Shell—as well as other new licensing announcements for 2018 and beyond!. Plus, join the Q&A for a chance to win special giveaway items!

So come check out the Kodansha Comics panel on Saturday July 21, 2018 at 11:30am-12:30pm in Room 8!

“Do I have to be there?” For giveaways and fun—yes! But for the info, just check back here at kodanshacomics.com for breaking updates on our panel announcements!

Eisner Winner update!

 Congratulations to Katsuhiro Otomo and the designers and editors behind our Akira 35th Anniversary Edition box set, which won in two categories on July 20 at San Diego Comic-Con’s  2018 Will Eisner Comic Book Industry Awards!

Best Publication Design
Product design by Phil Balsman, Akira Saito (Veia), NORMA Editorial, and MASH•ROOM

Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books
By Katsuhiro Otomo, edited by Haruko Hashimoto, Ajani Oloye, and Lauren Scanlan

BIG kudos to all of you!

July 21 update!

Meanwhile, at our San Diego Comic Con panel, besides having special guest Shu Hashimoto, the editor of Boarding School Juliet, share behind-the-scenes process for making hit manga, we here at Kodansha Comics also made several new announcements—including new art reveal for the Battle Angel Alita box set (coming November 2018), and several August digital-first titles, including five yaoi titles launching August 21! Here’s the rundown:

Battle Angel Alita 
Coming November 2018, the  Battle Angel Alita Deluxe Edition Box Set includes Volumes 1-5 of the Battle Angel Alita Deluxe Edition, plus the Holy Night and Other Stories collection and a huge poster featuring brand new color art by Yukito Kishiro, created exclusively for this set!

Check it out! Here’s a first look at the poster art! 

The Ghost in the Shell: Global Neural Network 
The Ghost in the Shell: Global Neural Network, the anthology of The Ghost in the Shell  is coming this fall. The full creator credit and synopsis for the four stories had been revealed!

Story 1: “Automatic Behavior” by Max Gladstone & David López 
In this story by Max Gladstone, author of the Hugo-nominated Craft Sequence novels, and David López, the star artist of All-New Wolverine, Kusanagi and Aramaki are visiting Shanghai under cover as trade attachés when Aramaki is abducted in a sudden attack. Kusanagi recognizes the kidnappers as an elite American squadron she faced years earlier in Laos. But something is wrong – these soldiers should all be dead. Aramaki awakens inside a simulated world where his captors use repetition and pain to wear him down. Cut off from support, Kusanagi will have to reunite with an old friend to discover who has taken Aramaki and recover him before they break his ICE and access his ghost.

Story 2: “Redbloods” by Alex de Campi & Giannis Milonogiannis
From legendary writer Alex de Campi (Twisted Romance, Grindhouse) and Giannis Milonogiannis of Image Comics’s acclaimed Prophet. A raid on a pleasure cruise off the coast of Yokohama unveils an international gang of smugglers trading illegally in the cyber-bodies of children. The trail leads to a dank corner of what was once Louisiana, where Togusa and Saito find themselves alone and outgunned. Meanwhile, Chief Aramaki and Major Kusanagi clash over a difference in philosophy with major implications for one little girl.

Story 3: “After the Ball Is Over” by Genevieve Valentine & Brent Schoonover
By Genevieve Valentine (Catwoman) and Brent Schoonover (Ant-Man), this story is set amid the aftermath of the war that divided the United States into three separate entities now at an uneasy peace. A woman has lived without augmentations, making a living by smuggling information the analog way. But an encounter with a man she never thought to see again drives her to stick her neck out one last time, and brave the checkpoints and suspicion that now pock what was once the land of the free.

Story 4: “Star Gardens” by Brenden Fletcher & LRNZ
From the explosive combination of Brenden Fletcher (Batgirl, Motor Crush) and LRNZ (Golem) comes an exploration of the nature of identity and imagination, punctuated by stylized fights and homages to every past incarnation of Section 9. A mind-blowing, kinetic descent into the mind of Major Motoko Kusanagi concludes The Ghost in the Shell: Global Neural Network.

 Digital-First New Releases: August 2018 

Debuts August 7th! My Boy in Blue By Maki Miyoshi 
Kako gets tangled up when she lies about her age in order to attend a company-mixer party for singles and ends up totally infatuated with her young local policeman! And it looks like it’s mutual with Kota… until he finds out Kako’s still in high school. Read on to see if straight-arrow Kota manages to find a way to do the right thing as our story unfolds in the first volume of this upbeat new romantic comedy from Maki Miyoshi!

Debuts August 14th! Back Street Girls By Jasmine Gyuh 
Tough gangland retribution takes a disturbingly bright, shiny turn in this insanely guilty pleasure about 3 yakuzas who, as repayment for their failures, must undergo major surgery and become … a hot female idol trio! So what happens when they become the next big pop sensation!?     

Debuts August 28th! Peach Girl by Miwa Ueda  
Yes! The complete 18-volume run of Miwa Ueda’s ‘90s shojo megahit Peach Girl is back! Suntans and bleached hair were never quite so problematic, and high school drama was never quite so …. dramatic! This digital reissued edition combines the original Tokyopop run of Peach Girl and Peach Girl: Change of Heart.

… and last but not least! In addition to the print yaoi and yuri manga announcements we made at Anime Expo, we announced five new yaoi titles from Kodansha’s Honey Milk imprint for release on August 21! Behold:

Stray Bullet Baby by Kei Ichikawa 
Chihiro Murakami works at a film advertising firm and looks up to Kiyoharu Honna, the stylish editor of the trendy magazine his company does business with. He’s cool, his smile is beautiful, and he’s good at his job. But Chihiro hasn’t had a chance yet to get close to him. However, one day he ends up looking after a dead-drunk Honna and goes home with him and … !? A selfish beauty and the man wrapped around his finger.

Keeping His Whims in Check by Pi
Proclaimed handsome elite businessman, Yuto Shinonome, falls in love at first sight with Tamaki, a beauty who’s exactly his type. It hits him like a ton of bricks when he finds out Tamaki is actually a guy!! Nevertheless, Yuto still acts like a kid with a crush and teases Tamaki like there’s no tomorrow … How can perverse Yuto handle love!?

Intertwining Lives by KAZU
Yoshiya thinks it’s fate when he’s reunited with his first love; however, he learns they can never be together … For middle-aged scriptwriter Makoto and beautiful actor-in-the-making Yuu, it’s a chance meeting in which admiration turns to love, and love turns to doubt …?! A young and heartrending adolescent love story and a bittersweet mature romance. The stories of a group of men who mingle, intertwine, and change.

Key Ring Lock by ymz
Permanent part-timer, Yui, discovers a worn-out man fallen on the street. Unable to leave the strangely charming Toshiki alone, Yui helps him back home and then accepts Toshiki while being manipulated by him. However, when Yui gets up in the morning, he finds himself locked in and unable to leave. “Confinement is my hobby,” says a smiling Toshiki. Is this confinement, or is it … Their sensitive love flickers in the space between the normal and abnormal!

Trap in a Skirt by Puruchome
Androgynous Aoi has a traumatic past that makes it difficult for him to get the true satisfaction he desires. Meanwhile, Aoi’s classmate, Takano, the rough class outsider, makes a move on Aoi whenever he has the chance. Aoi doesn’t take him seriously in the beginning, however …

July 17 update!

Special guest appearance: Shu Hashimoto
At this year’s Kodansha Comics panel, we have special guest Shu Hashimoto—manga editor extraordinaire from Kodansha Japan. Shu’s worked closely behind-the-scenes with the creators of hit series you love like Fairy Tail, Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches … and he’s also the founding editor of the up-and-coming manga-to-anime series, Boarding School Juliet! Mr. Hashimoto will share the creative process and behind-the-scenes of the making of our next hit manga!



Wanna know what’s like to be a manga editor? 

You can also follow Mr. Hashimoto on Twitter at @wmhashimoto 

Panel Exclusive: BECK Stickers!
To celebrate the launch of Harold Sakuishi’s ye olde schoole and ye newe schoole manga, i.e., BECK and Seven Shakespeares on comiXology Originals, we’ve got these here panel-exclusive BECK stickers! Be sure to come to Kodansha Comics panel early and grab one to decorate your laptop, drum set, ukulele, or whatever instruments of thy choice!